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Led Zeppelin and the Rolling Stones Fight Swarms of Crickets in Nevada

Led Zeppelin and the Rolling Stones Fight Swarms of Crickets in Nevada

According to Wikipedia, there are four types of cricket song: a calling song to attract females, a courting song when the female is near, an aggressive song to ward off other male crickets, and a post-coital song to celebrate that the deed has been done. Why am I telling you this? If you’re a resident of a town named Tuscarora in Nevada, you may already know the answer.

The folks in Tuscarora are plagued by an annual invasion of crickets, whose chirping habits have spiraled out of control. Life in the small Nevada town gets noisy between May and August, when millions of crickets descend and start breeding. Things have got so bad that resident Laura Moore told the Wall Street Journal: "You'll wake up and there'll be one sitting on your forehead, looking at you."

To combat these singing swine, Moore and the other residents of Tuscarora have taken to blasting rock music, specifically Led Zeppelin and the Rolling Stones, at the invading hordes. "Crickets kind of sleep at night,” says Moore. “So I would wake up first thing in the morning to get the music on and we would shut the music off at night.”

Incredibly, it works, with the crickets forced out of range of the music as the combined vocals of Mick Jagger and Robert Plant act like some kind of audible insect repellent. Could this be a way for the music biz to finally make some money again? The bug spray industry may suddenly find itself reeling as it's replaced by bottled Stones and Zeppelin music, guaranteed to leave insects feeling “Dazed and Confused.”

 

[via Gigwise]

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Led Zeppelin
The Rolling Stones

In SE Louisiana the Devil's Horses, also known as the eastern lubber, have taken hold. They munch on various plants in gardens and have no natural predators. They need to go back to where they belong - the East Coast (just like the armadillo needs to go back to where it belongs - Mexico, among other things around here).
Since they have no predators, are toxic and make various animals sick that do eat them the only thing to do is stomp on them. And no bug spray has any effect on them.
I found one - DW40. Kills them, no matter how small or big they are. I started using WD40 for bee and caterpillar stings and sprayed some fire ants and yellow jackets and noticed the ones that were sprayed died. So I've been spraying the Devi's Horses. I've killed probably 300 hatchlings in the past 2 weeks. Of course, one has to be careful not to spray the leaves of a plant because it will screw it up.

Skip Stone

Thanks for that Skip, very informative. WD40 has so many uses, it's so versatile.

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